Raisin Focaccia

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Murphy’s Law says that if I am trying to watch what I eat, my coworker will bring indulgent things into the office like raisin or jalapeño focaccia from Liguria Bakery. These  things, I cannot resist.  But now, it’s time to fight fire with fire. Little does he know I’m the one bringing in the Raisin Focaccia now.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Let’s back up! A few weeks ago my dad and I ventured into Liguria Bakery to get some different kinds of focaccia and this cold lady told us curtly that we missed the window for having raisin focaccia. She scoffed at us for trying to buy it an hour past her cutoff and it was followed by a huge “Pssshaw!!” I actually did a web search and found THIS PICTURE. HAHAHA. That’s the lady!  If Seinfeld was back on, I’d suggest they create an episode called The Focaccia Nazi.  You should have seen her face when we politely asked if she could cut our focaccia in half, as we were splitting it. Oof. Too much!

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

The only problem is that their raisin focaccia is really really good; definitely worth a trip if you’re in San Francisco. Make sure you go early in the morning or you won’t get their beloved raisin focaccia. Pleasantries don’t work. Even killing her with kindness won’t get a smile from her. Just get in and out with that focaccia! The raisin focaccia is light, fluffy and the raisins are juicy and plump. It’s a bit savory and a bit sweet. It’s perfection! To avoid another encounter where I missed the cutoff, I took the bull by the horns and made my own. And for you, I’d gladly cut you a slice or three.

And we’re off!

Gather your ingredients. I love when I stumble upon an accidental vegan recipe. Wait! Is yeast vegan?

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

The first step is to soak the raisins in boiling water. This helps make them plump and juicy.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Drain the raisins and reserve 2 cups of the liquid. Add olive oil to that liquid. This will go into the dough.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

In a stand mixer, with a dough hook attachment, mix all the dry ingredients.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Now slowly add the raisins.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Followed by the liquid!

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

DOUGH!

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

This is the part where I tell you to get a baking sheet and spread oil on top of it.

Then dump out your dough on a floured work surface and knead until it all comes together.

Plop dough on the baking sheet and stretch it out. There’s a series of letting it rest and then spreading it out til it reaches the corners. I would have taken pictures during this process but SOMEBODY was working with floured hands and a dead camera battery. Note to self, buy a spare battery.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

After the dough has risen…You poke your fingers in there. I didn’t poke it enough (I was scared).

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

And spread oil on top. In Martha’s recipe, she calls for sanding sugar but I skipped it.

I don’t want an overly sweet focaccia. You know what I mean?

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Ahhh. BAKED. A thing of beauty. When I say this makes A LOT, a lot is an UNDERSTATEMENT.

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

For example, this is only half of the focaccia! If you’re not making it for a crowd, you should totally freeze the rest!

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

But then you might find yourself trying every section…

Raisin Focaccia // shutterbean

Wait! I didn’t get a RIGHT end piece…or an UPPER right end piece… You catch my drift…

Wait till you get a piece that has extra olive oil on it. SO GOOD.

Raisin Focaccia

makes 1 17x 12 inch bread

recipe adapted from Martha Stewart’s Baking Cookbook

  • 3 cup  raisins
  • 3 cups boiling water
  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound 10 ounces (about 5 cups) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

In a large bowl, combine raisins with the boiling water; let soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Drain fruit, reserving 2 cups of the soaking liquid; set fruit aside. Add 1/4 cup olive oil to the soaking liquid. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, granulated sugar, yeast, salt, and cinnamon; mix just to combine. With mixer on low speed, add raisins and soaking liquid. Mix until the fruit is evenly distributed but the dough is still tacky, about 3 minutes.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured work surface, and knead for 1 minute. Pour 1/2 cup olive oil onto a 17-by-12-inch rimmed baking sheet, coating the bottom completely. Place the dough on top of the oil, and use your hands to spread it out as much as possible without tearing (it doesn’t have to fit the pan). Cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap, and continue to pat and press the dough toward the edges. Set pan in a warm place, and let rest, pressing out the dough every 10 minutes until it fills the pan, about 45 minutes. Let rest until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Meanwhile, place a baking stone on the floor of the oven. Preheat oven to 425 degrees

Using your fingers press dimples into dough. Drizzle dough with remaining 1/4 cup olive oil. Set the baking sheet directly on the stone and bake, rotating sheet halfway through, until focaccia is deep golden brown on top and bottom, 35 to 45 minutes. Immediately slide the focaccia onto a cutting board to cool. Use a pizza wheel or a serrated knife to cut bread into triangles, and serve warm. Focaccia can be kept at room temperature, wrapped in plastic, for 2 to 3 days.

***notes***

Keep an eye on the focaccia in the oven, it might take less than the called for time to bake. If you see that the focaccia is turning golden too quick, put a sheet of aluminum foil on top to prevent it from burning.

 

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70 Comments

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  • September 11, 2013

    This looks crazy good. This is going on my MUST MAKE NOW list.

  • September 11, 2013

    I have wanted to make a sweet-ish interpretation of focaccia for awhile and your bread looks fab! Pinned!

  • Jane M
    September 11, 2013

    This looks drop dead gorgeous! YUUUM!

  • September 11, 2013

    Looks and sound amazing. Business owners like this woman always inwardly crack me up. They take themselves so seriously. I mean, it’s good that she can at least back it up, but doesn’t she wear herself out being cranky so much of the time? Ha.

    http://www.fullbellywornsoles.com

  • perber
    September 11, 2013

    yummmmm.. raisins in bread are delicious!! I will be thinking about this focaccia all day at work until I can go home and make it!

  • September 11, 2013

    That lady looks kind of frightening! I would worry I would be like Elaine and be tapping the counter top trying to decide what else I wanted. Good thing you saved us all from her judgments by making this recipe!

  • jenny
    September 11, 2013

    I have been craving this focaccia ever since I saw your photo. it’s going to be a sweltering 90+ in boston today (wha?), but this weekend I am DEFINITELY making it! now for a request: how about liguria’s pizza focaccia? want to tackle that for us (me)? pretty please?? :)

  • September 11, 2013

    This looks amazing. Love that there’s a focaccia nazi too. I really do.

  • Sarah R.
    September 11, 2013

    Oh my stars does that look good (apparently I’ve started talking like my grandmother now)! I think I just found a baking project for me this weekend!

  • September 11, 2013

    Take THAT Focaccia Nazi!! <3 it Tracy..

  • Amanda Barkey
    September 11, 2013

    wow. i have never tried making focaccia but this seems so simple and not many ingredients! i love love love cinnamon raisin bread so i am all over this! great post Tracy! ps- fight fire with fire hahaha i love that.

  • Tejas
    September 11, 2013

    Nice! I will try this over the weekend.
    I have tried ‘raisin bread’ before but not this way. This looks amazing.

  • September 11, 2013

    Yay! The focaccia re pie I’ve been waiting for! Sounds super duper delish, can’t wait to make it!! :) x

  • Jenny K
    September 11, 2013

    This looks BOMB! Do you have any tricks on getting yeasted doughs to rise? I have really struggled with this. I’ve checked the dates on my yeast and tried various “warm” places, but to no avail.

    • jenny
      September 11, 2013

      make sure the water in which you’re activating your yeast isn’t too hot. for active dry yeast, you want between 105 and 115 degrees (F). also, I find it helps to put in a pinch or two of white sugar into the water–gives the yeast something to feed on right away and really gets them going. for instant yeast, which this recipe calls for, water should be no hotter than 125(F). since the water will be full of natural sugars from the raisins, the yeast should get going no problem.

      • Tracy
        September 11, 2013

        Thanks for answering this!

        • Sandra
          September 11, 2013

          Omg….husband is a MAJOR focaccia addict, but not a baker. So I will just have to *suffer* through the carb-fest and make this for him ;) Wait – one question. So, should I assume that I should always activate yeast (instant or not) in any recipe? This recipe doesnt call for the yeast to be activated, so I would have just thrown it in dry. Is that wrong?

          • Tracy
            September 11, 2013

            I threw it in dry. It worked! The recipe doesn’t require you to activate the yeast.

          • jenny
            September 12, 2013

            that was my bad–I was typing too quickly above. with instant yeast, the yeast is always mixed into the dry ingredients. that’s why the water can be (and needs to be) slightly warmer–because the yeast gets activated in the dough itself, instead of in a separate solution. recipes with instant yeast tend to be a little more forgiving (provided you don’t use boiling water or something) because you’re not combining the yeast and warm water directly.

      • Jenny K
        September 11, 2013

        Thank you so much for your advice! The dough has risen! I’m so encouraged. I was getting ready to throw in the towel after so many failed attempts at yeasted doughs. Thank you!!!

        • L
          September 12, 2013

          I just made this and it is yummy and crunchy and salty and wonderful! I baked it 20 minutes and it was already done (in fact, a little burnt) so next time, i will probably bake it for 15 minutes and check up until 18. it got nice and golden brown on top but our vulcan gets really hot so i’m not surprised it was much less time. anyway, this was easy and so tasty. i’m impressed with myself today. really, i am:-)

          • Tracy
            September 12, 2013

            hopefully you saw my note (in time) about baking it under the allotted amount Martha says! Glad you liked it!

  • September 11, 2013

    I have always wanted to make foccacia! Adding raisins sounds wonderful!

  • you read my mind – I have been dreaming about this bread for a while now.

  • September 11, 2013

    That lady looks like she doesn’t dole out smiles very often. But then again, I’d probably hoard focaccia that’s this delicious too! Yum!

  • melissa
    September 11, 2013

    so funny …we went there a few months ago after i saw you post something about liguria!! she was totally rude and we had to get onion because that was all that was left. we were giving her our whole order, thinking there would be more in the back, but nope, what you see is what you get!! but it was sooooo good :)

  • Holly
    September 11, 2013

    I say, your foccacia looks just as good as Liguria’s, and this was your first attempt! Props to you, and thanks for the recipe.

  • September 11, 2013

    Would it be wrong for me to make this for dinner?

  • September 11, 2013

    This looks so good! And that picture is hilarious. She is… intense!

  • September 11, 2013

    This sounds lovely!! I love some good focaccia.

  • Some vegans may argue it’s not truly vegan with white sugar (due to the bleaching processes) but I’ll take it!

  • Kate
    September 11, 2013

    You mention that half this recipe could be frozen given the vast quantities it makes. Is this while it’s still dough, or after it’s been baked? If the dough can be frozen, at what stage during the raising process should it be frozen?
    So many questions, but it looks too good to make a mess of the first batch. It’s breakfast time here in Australia and I’d really much prefer a warm slice of this than the bowl of cereal I have awaiting me :)

    • Tracy
      September 11, 2013

      I froze half of the batch AFTER I baked it. I let it sit on the counter overnight (covered) and toasted it in the morning. Still fantastic! I, myself am apprehensive to freeze doughs because I worry that things won’t turn out. I’m sure you could find some type of documentation online that would help. Good luck!

  • September 11, 2013

    Yes, I want some. Foccacia is the best and now with raisins! It looks amazingly delicious.

  • Kara
    September 11, 2013

    I knew your inspiration would be from Liguria Bakery! My mom was also inspired to make her own raisin focaccia and also green onion from our frequent visits there. You should also try the pizza flavor they have too! And try putting sea salt on top of the raisin focaccia (it tastes amazing with the sweetness of the raisins).

    • Tracy
      September 11, 2013

      the pizza flavor is good!!! I LOVE IT.

  • September 11, 2013

    Put a piece or two of this in your purse. Go back to the bakery after the cutoff. When she yells at you, rummage around in your purse, then triumphantly pull out your piece of homemade and say, “OH WAIT. I forgot I made some EVEN BETTER than yours yesterday! How convenient.”

    • Tracy
      September 11, 2013

      HAHAHAHAHA. I like this.

      • jenny
        September 17, 2013

        I love this!!!! That is BRILLIANT.

  • September 12, 2013

    Oh my God!
    Divine goodness in dough form! xx

  • September 12, 2013

    I finally got round to buying a stand mixer and this is definitely going on the list of things I will now be able to make with ease! Thanks Tracy!

  • Amanda
    September 12, 2013

    This looks delicious!

  • Beth
    September 12, 2013

    I see this with some bleu cheese and a nice bottle of red in my near future! Also to note, every one of your bread-dough based recipes has turned out fantastic for me! If I was a millionaire I’d pay you to produce a cookbook!

  • September 12, 2013

    this is the most amazing amazing thing i’ve ever seen!

    it’s a mixture between a pain aux raisins (my favourite pastry) and a hot cross bun!!!

    you’re incredible!!! i want a slice now :D!

  • September 12, 2013

    Oooo….YES. I must make this. I hate when good food comes with a side of snobbiness. Let’s just all be friends and eat yummy things!

  • L
    September 12, 2013

    I just made this and it is yummy and crunchy and salty and wonderful! I baked it 20 minutes and it was already done (in fact, a little burnt) so next time, i will probably bake it for 15 minutes and check up until 18. it got nice and golden brown on top but our vulcan gets really hot so i’m not surprised it was much less time. anyway, this was easy and so tasty. i’m impressed with myself today. really, i am:-)

  • Beverly
    September 12, 2013

    Thanks so much for sharing this with us. It was so delicious! Love.Mom and Dad

  • September 13, 2013

    Yum! I just made a fresh fig focaccia; I’ll have to try this when the figs go away. http://www.strawberryplum.com/fig-rosemary-schiacciata/

  • Jane
    September 13, 2013

    Hello! Is it possible to make this without a stand mixer? Looks soo delicious but no stand mixer. Thanks!

  • Laura
    September 15, 2013

    Hi Tracy! I just love your blog and every recipe of yours I have made has been a huge hit! This raisin focaccia is at the top of my list now…I just bought some raisins for it, and can’t wait to get started. But I did have a question for you — I don’t have a baking stone, and since I don’t bake all that often I don’t know that it’s a wise investment. Do you think the recipe would work without a baking stone, or do you have a suggested alternative? Maybe if I placed the baking sheet on top of a cast iron skillet that I heated ahead of time? Thanks!

    • Tracy
      September 15, 2013

      Try a baking sheet on the bottom rack of the oven! Should work out just fine :) And if you don’t have one, I don’t think it makes a big deal.

  • felicia
    September 16, 2013

    Probably going to make this tonight with my son, who loves cooking (at 27 months!). Do you think the dough would be OK in a break machine? Also reminded me of Nigel Slater’s blackberry focaccia recipe, which is killer. http://www.foodandwine.com/blogs/2012/2/3/nigel-slaters-blackberry-focaccia

    • Tracy
      September 16, 2013

      Did you mean bread machine? I’m not familiar with bread machines (sadly!!) so it might be worth googling to check out the ratios & such.

  • Jane
    September 16, 2013

    Hi! Can this be made without a stand mixer?

    • Tracy
      September 16, 2013

      The dough is quite sticky, so I think if you were to try to mix it by hand, you would next extra flour so it wouldn’t stick so much when you’re kneading it.

  • September 17, 2013

    Rosemary and raisin is wonderful. Maybe add rosemary to half?

  • September 18, 2013

    I LOVE raisins in bread. I could eat the entire thing. Saving and pinning!

  • September 22, 2013

    Oh dear lord! I’m making this today. We have a burger place with it’s only special hateful person working there… I warn everyone but we still go. The only time I ever saw this lady smile or talk was when my husband was putting ketchup on his fries…she said -now that is someone who knows who knows how to squirt ketchup…huh?

  • September 25, 2013

    I love the picture of the mean focaccia lady, really adds to the story! This recipe sounds different and lovely.

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